WINTER 2013 NEWS | INVASIVE PLANTS PUSHED BACK IN ROSE CREEK WATERSHED

clc-rosecreekw-sea_of_pampas3The Conservancy has been busy this fall and winter removing invasive, non-native plants from the Rose Creek watershed in the heart of suburban San Diego near University City and Claremont. Non-native plants can act like slow-motion bulldozers, displacing native plants and eliminating important wildlife habitat in San Diego’s canyon nature preserves. Non-native plants also often grow in dense clumps near homes that increase the risk of wildfire. To address these threats, the Conservancy applied for and received a grant from the California Wildlife Conservation Board to fund professional treatment of the plant pests. The Conservancy’s consultant, RECON Environmental, has treated over fifteen acres of non-native invasive plants including twelve acres of Pampas grass and over two thousand invasive trees like Eucalyptus and Brazilian pepper. Work will be suspended during the breeding bird season that starts on February 15 but will resume in fall 2013.

linkedinlinkedin